Home > Contracts & Law > The Law & Verbal Agreements

The Law & Verbal Agreements

By: Garry Crystal - Updated: 18 Jan 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Verbal Agreements Legal Binding

Many people are not aware that verbal agreements are in many cases as legally binding as written contracts. Verbal contracts can be upheld by a court if someone decides to breach the agreement, although without written terms and conditions it may be difficult to prove.

Conditions of a Verbal Agreement

Under law there are two basic terms that constitute a binding agreement. The verbal agreement will be binding if there was an agreement on the services to be performed and an agreement was reached on remuneration for this service. This agreement can be reached by a verbal exchange in person, via telephone or via an email.

There are certain contracts and agreements that must be made in writing and these will include the sale of property, tenancy agreements, copyright transfer, and contracts for consumer credit. In some cases, verbal agreements will not be upheld in court, not because of the lack of a written agreement but because the terms of the verbal agreement were not clarified.

Written Agreements

For any agreement concerning an exchange of services it is a wise idea to have some form of contract or written statement. The contract or statement should include the terms and conditions of the agreement and is particularly helpful if a dispute between the parties occurs.

Complete Verbal Agreements

In order for a verbal agreement to be legally binding the agreement must have reached completeness. This means that all terms and conditions have been reached and agreed regarding services and terms of pay. Agreements will be incomplete when there are still further terms and conditions to be agreed. Agreements in principle will not usually be upheld in court and will not usually be considered complete verbal agreements.

Verbal Agreements and Disputes

If either party has decided to break a contract then the matter can be taken to the legal courts. In most cases the dispute may rest on the justification of the terms of the verbal agreement. There are a few ways that a judge will try and establish the terms of the agreement. These could include investigating what actually happened in practice. This can include the services that were actually undertaken and if any money whatsoever was paid for any services.

Enforcing a Verbal Agreement

Apart from taking the matter to court there are other ways to enforce a verbal agreement. If money is owed then the matter can be passed on to a collection agency to try to enforce the matter for you. The disgruntled party can also apply pressure themselves by sending letter, emails and making telephone calls to the person who is in breach of contract. Copies of all emails and letters should be kept in case the matter does reach the law courts.

Payment before Service

One way of avoiding this sort of dispute ever occurring may be to ask for some form of payment before supplying a service. Although the customer may not always agree to this it may be an option to consider. In some cases if a person is going to breach a contract and withhold payment then the odds are they may never have intended to pay for the service in the first place. In many cases though a customer may not like the idea of paying for a service until the job is completed for fear of non completion.

Threatening court action for breach of a verbal contract may not actually help the matter at all if one party intended not to carry through on the agreement. However the law does consider complete verbal agreements as Legally Binding and the matter can be brought to the law courts for a judge to make the final decision.

One interesting question is 'does a text message create a legally binding contract?'. Richard Brittle of Brittle Motors based in Stoke-on-Trent believes that it does. Over the coming weeks our leading in-house barrister will report on her findings which should make for interesting reading.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
I've paid for 40 sessions with a personal trainer, we've verbally agreed on the terms such as what comes with these sessions i.e. training, nutritional advice etc. I've received an invoice with the following, 40 sessions, name of my trainer, date of arrangement & amount due. I've paid the money upfront however my trainer was meant to send me the nutritional information along with starting weight/body fat yet is quite slow upon doing this compared to texting me straight after our first encounter along with emailing the invoice. I can't help but feel a little anxious/concerned as something doesn't feel right. I looked into their company a little further (the trainer is self employed(under another company), uses a gym for his sessions) on gov sites their company's status is dissolved and my trainer is being slow in sending info etc. I'm concerned because now he has the money there could be a chance that he won't bother providing a decent service and has yet to book a time next week for a session. What are my rights? If he doesn't provide any sessions that I paid for, would I have a case in court? I didn't sign any contracts but if I was to see him and maybe draw up a contract would that protect both the trainer and myself (just incase he is genuine and I'm being paranoid) or would the invoice be evidence of the agreement made?
DM - 18-Jan-18 @ 5:46 PM
Two years ago I sold my car for £1000 to pay off some debts for my husband and have struggled without my own vehicle since then; we became estranged shortly afterwards but our relationship had been on/off. My estranged husband - on recently hearing I wished to divorce him - expressed a wish to reconciliation and offered to give me £1,500 in order to be able to buy a car and pay off some of my own debts. He then talked me into buying his car for £500 and said he would insure us both on a multiple car policy - my share of the insurance being £300. He then transferred £500 into my bank (an amount from the £1500) stating he would look after the other £200 for me. We shook on the car deal which was to go through the following week when his new used car was delivered, but it later occurred to me that the car would have to remain in his name as both Owner and Keeper for the insurance to be valid. When I expressed some doubts about this he assured me if our reconciliation didn’t work he would still give me the car and the logbook and would not go back on his word. Several days later he became angry over a trifling matter and walked out of my home (he lives with this elderly parent in a house he part owns). He has not returned and has expressed he will not be doing so. He is refusing to hand over the vehicle (insured or otherwise) or any outstanding monies from our agreement (£1000 if he keeps the car). His new car arrives in a day or so and he intends to sell the car we shook on to his friend for £500. I have nothing to state I bought the car as he was giving me the money to buy it, and I have no logbook or receipt. I’m still on his original insurance for the car as named driver but he won’t allow me any access to it or any further funds. Do I have a leg (or four wheels) to stand on?
MrsPeabody - 16-Jan-18 @ 10:24 AM
13 years ago my parents offered to help me get a home. The house was $100,000 and my parents offered to use 50,000 of my grandma's inheritance money to them and all I have to do is pay off the other 50,000 which over the 13 years I added a $20,000 car and then my wife needed a car which was 17000 which is all paid in full now as of 6 months ago. I paid roughly 7,000 to tie into city sewer and almost 2,000 in a new water system 2500 on fencing in the one acre property and almost 10,000 in remodeling the interior over the last 13 years. I have paid almost $10,000 in property tax since I've been here and have to buy flood insurance which is probably around $5,000 through the time I've been here. Due to the fact my mom hates my wife she has made it clear that I will never own this home. So why do I pay for insurance to rebuild their house if something happens. I feel like I'm at the end of my rope in my wife cried for hours when she heard that. This was a verbal contract all on their terms and I held up my end of the deal perfectly paying as much as 2000 to $3,000 a month with the belief of being able to own my home as soon as it's paid off. This was a verbal contract and felt completely safe doing something like this because it is my family. The house is worth $185,000 now and that was going to be my nest egg. At this point I would just like my $50,000 back the 10,000 in property tax I paid and 5000 and insurance money I've paid and 7000 in sewer hookup. My wife and I could take that money and put a down payment on something that will actually be ours. I would much rather keep my house that we have worked so hard on for all these years and we love the area and the yard but if anything ever happened to me my mom would kick my wife out on the street. What are my options? I am carrying a tape recorder with me in case I run into my mom I can record the conversation and document the verbal contract that we once had. If anyone has any advice and can help me out I would be so appreciative. Thanks for reading
Seabass - 8-Jan-18 @ 7:25 PM
Hi i've had an expensive high quality bull for many years.This bull has given my family financial stability for years.Out of my good heart i decided to lend my friend So he can breed his animals and give him a start on his farm. I told him he has to promise to take care of it as his own and give it back in two months. Unfortunately my bull got away and was found wrapped in barbed wire in a ditch and he was put to sleep due to the length of time he suffered. Any recourse i can take ? Now i have no idea how i'm going to continue my business and i am suffering great loss. Please help.
leey - 7-Jan-18 @ 1:32 AM
JW - Your Question:
Two years ago I purchased a leasehold flat which did not have residential planning permission. The flat is located within a block of service flats for which a monthly service charge is payable on each flat. Shortly after purchase I was contacted by the freeholder, from whom I bought the flat, and he asked that I start paying service rent on my purchased flat. When I protested on the grounds that I could not occupy the flat and therein benefit from the services he verbally agreed to waive service rent until the point at which residential planning on my flat would be obtained. Unfortunately, residential planning was turned down by the local planners and the freeholder has since requested that the service charge be paid. This is contrary to what was verbally agreed and so I am keen to know what my legal position is regarding payment of the service charge. Also, because the flat can not be occupied and can therefore not enjoy the benefits afforded by a serviced residential flat whether that too may have a bearing on things. Please can you advise.

Our Response:
If you bought the flat knowing it was a service flat and a service charge was linked to the contract, then you have agreed to the terms of the contract when buying the property. The fact you have been unable to change the property to residential use the gamble you have taken. You may wish to seek legal advice regarding this matter as much depends upon the nature of the sale, i.e where you given to believe a change of use from service to residential use was an option? If so, then you may wish to take the matter further. However, if you bought the flat knowing it was a service flat and were not guaranteed that any 'change of use' was an option, then unfortunately there is little you can do and you would have to abide by the contract, which you signed.
ContractsAndAgreements - 18-Dec-17 @ 10:51 AM
Two years ago I purchased a leasehold flat which did not have residential planning permission. The flat is located within a block of service flats for which a monthly service charge is payable on each flat. Shortly after purchase i was contacted by the freeholder, from whom i bought the flat, and he asked that I start paying service rent on my purchased flat. When i protested on the grounds that i could not occupy the flat and therein benefit from the services he verbally agreed to waive service rent until the point at which residential planning on my flat would be obtained. Unfortunately, residential planning was turned down by the local planners and the freeholder has since requested that the service charge be paid. This is contrary to what was verbally agreed and so i am keen to know what my legal position is regarding payment of the service charge. Also, because the flat can not be occupied and can therefore not enjoy the benefits afforded by a serviced residential flat whether that too may have a bearing on things. Please can you advise.
JW - 15-Dec-17 @ 8:57 PM
HiI had a hire purchase agreement which due to unforeseen circumstances I was forced to voluntary terminate, 2 months after I submitted the termination I had verbal confirmation that it had been accepted. I was also advised that I would recieve a letter explaining the next steps (this never happened). I then called the supplier to advise that I couldn't continue to make the monthly payments and would like to arrange a payment plan for any outstanding balance. At this point they verbally confirmed that I had cleared the balance and there was nothing left to pay and that I should cancel my direct debit. I queried this as I was expecting a balance and after further confirmation and the call handler had checked with her manager they assured me the balance was clear and they would cancel the direct debt but I should notify my bank to be sure.A couple of month later I received a letter saying I was in arrears. I challenged this with the supplier where they admitted I was given incorrect information and their recordings and logs validate this but there is nothing they can do. I complained and they offered me £50 as a gesture of good will. I refused this and have taken it to the financial ombudsman who have stated they only try to put things back to how they were before the mistake was made but have managed to get the supplier to agree to a £150 payment. From my position they verbally ended the contract with me and after my questioning and further reassurance from them I accepted this. Do I have any standing to make a case against them?
Jonathan - 26-Nov-17 @ 7:55 PM
Hello I phoned a company to query about in house first aid training. Even though I couldn't commit to a date they "provisionally" booked the course. The course was for a few adults and a few under 16 year olds. Just short of 2 weeks before the date I had to cancel as people could make the date they suggested. They are now suing me for cancelling without 2 weeks notice. 1) have I entered a verbal contract?(I haven't signed or paid for services) 2) I never received any services so why are they trying to sue me for the course cost? 3) under HER guidelines under 16 years of age cannot perform first aid or become qualified. Surely this is classed as mis selling from the company? Any help or guidance is appreciated.
Kaylgriff - 21-Nov-17 @ 1:29 PM
@Kay - if the ad said it was, yes and you can prove you had been mis-sold the tape as you were buying based upon the information given in the ad.
ConU - 20-Nov-17 @ 3:01 PM
What if something from a verbal agreement was not in the written contract? Say for example I bought a cellphone that was advertised to hold 16GB storage but the retailer did not write it in the contract that I signed. After using the phone I discovered that it only holds 8GB. Would I still have a case against him despite that specification not being in the written contract?
Kay - 20-Nov-17 @ 2:53 AM
I was seconded to another region for a few months earlier this year.As the end of the secondment came closer a senior Manager approached me with an offer to stay for a further 4 months.I said that I’d ask my family (as the secondment means I have to be away from home during the work week).After much consideration I agreed on the basis that I would be paid the additional money monthly over the next 4 months.Every week I’ve had a meeting with the manager and there has been a different reason as to why it hasn’t been paid.I have now been there 9 months and was told that they can’t pay me the money.I have emailed the manager at least once a month with the agreement but haven’t had any written acknowledgment back.Directors, HR and other senior managers have been involved and discussed this with me but it’s just been verbal agreements on their part. Please advise if I can take any further steps. Thank you.
AB - 16-Nov-17 @ 6:30 PM
Bucko - Your Question:
A college from my work place asked me to build her a computer for her son ( I have qualifications in building and repairs of computers ) She agreed verbal and also over text and email for a £400 computer build afew months back and I told her I will supply invoices for parts and anything else after completion including boxes Afew weeks ago after giving me £250 out of the £400 (abit at a time over a few months since may ) shes demanded proof for parts total of £400 she has also now said she dosnt want the computer or any parts already ordered many over the 30 days return and has made threats for police courts also getting other people involved and bombarding me and family members with messages I have been told by citizens advice I have done nothing wrong and I shouldn't have to give her anything back as she has backed out of the deal before completion and I shouldn't hand her any proof of purchase only invoices she is now making threats to go to court and make my life hell as she's says What's my best option are citizens advice correct in saying not to give her anything as she has broken the contract

Our Response:
If you were building the computer for £400, some of this would be your own cost for labour (unless you had agreed there would be no charge for labour). If you wish to give her proof of the parts you have bought, then you are free to do so. But, your client isn't at liberty to demand how you have spent the money, your agreement is that you produce the computer at the end. If you can prove the work was on course as agreed (if she takes the matter to the small claims court) then your customer hasn't any grounds to complain. As Citizens Advice claims, she reneged on the agreement not you.
ContractsAndAgreements - 13-Nov-17 @ 2:22 PM
A college from my work place asked me to build her a computer for her son ( I have qualifications in building and repairs of computers ) She agreed verbal and also over text and email for a £400 computer build afew months back and I told her I will supply invoices for parts and anything else after completion including boxes Afew weeks ago after giving me £250 out of the £400 (abit at a time over a few monthssince may ) shes demanded proof for parts total of £400 she has also now said she dosnt want the computer or any parts already ordered many over the 30 days return and has made threats for police courts also getting other people involved and bombarding me and family members with messagesI have been told by citizens advice I have done nothing wrong and I shouldn't have to give her anything back as she has backed out of the deal before completion and I shouldn't hand her any proof of purchase only invoices she is now making threats to go to court and make my life hell as she's says What's my best option are citizens advice correct in saying not to give her anything as she has broken the contract
Bucko - 11-Nov-17 @ 3:29 PM
A college from my work place asked me to build her a computer for her son ( I have qualifications in building and repairs of computers ) She agreed verbal and also over text and email for a £400 computer build afew months back and I told her I will supply invoices for parts and anything else after completion including boxes Afew weeks ago after giving me £250 out of the £400 (abit at a time over a few monthssince may ) shes demanded proof for parts total of £400 she has also now said she dosnt want the computer or any parts already ordered many over the 30 days return and has made threats for police courts also getting other people involved and bombarding me and family members with messagesI have been told by citizens advice I have done nothing wrong and I shouldn't have to give her anything back as she has backed out of the deal before completion and I shouldn't hand her any proof of purchase only invoices she is now making threats to go to court and make my life hell as she's says What's my best option are citizens advice correct in saying not to give her anything as she has broken the contract
Bucko - 11-Nov-17 @ 3:10 PM
Lauren2392 - Your Question:
HiWhen my employer advertised my job it stated my position comes with a company car. I have the job advertisement to prove this and I also have a email from my manager stating that he advised me my position comes with a company car.HR are now saying that the position doesn’t come with a company car and as it isn’t in my contract I am not contractually entitled to one and therefor they won’t give me one even though I am performing all duties as set out in my job description.I had to pass my 6 months probation before being able to have a car and I feel I have been seriously misled. Does my job advertisement and the email I have from my manager form part of a contract? I have raised a grievance and I am hoping to take this information in with me.ThanksLauren

Our Response:
You would need to refer to your job offer confirmation in writing, which would have laid out the terms of your employment. You would have to raise the grievance and show the email and the advert to your employer, stating that you took the job on this assurance. You would have to seek advice from ACAS to see whether you have any recourse to take legal action.
ContractsAndAgreements - 7-Nov-17 @ 12:37 PM
Hi When my employer advertised my job it stated my position comes with a company car. I have the job advertisement to prove this and I also have a email from my manager stating that he advised me my position comes with a company car. HR are now saying that the position doesn’t come with a company car and as it isn’t in my contract I am not contractually entitled to one and therefor they won’t give me one even though I am performing all duties as set out in my job description. I had to pass my 6 months probation before being able to have a car and I feel I have been seriously misled. Does my job advertisement and the email I have from my manager form part of a contract? I have raised a grievance and I am hoping to take this information in with me. Thanks Lauren
Lauren2392 - 4-Nov-17 @ 8:44 AM
David - Your Question:
I was wondering if I may ask a question here- I looked for the information on the internet, but because of the particular terms of the arrangement, I could not really find an answer.I work as a personal assistant for a disabled person, 2 weeks on 2 weeks off live in basis. I get paid (payslip) every 4 weeks. I work minimum 12 hours/day/ 14 days.My question is: I am legally entitled to paid holiday after a year and if so, how many days?When I start the job we had a verbal agreement.I would very much appreciate if somebody will answer to me.

Our Response:
You can see all you need to know via the gov.uk link here. Regardless of whether you are working for an individual, you are still eligible for holiday pay. This should be calculated pro-rata on the hourly basis you work. You can calculate your holiday entitlement via the gov.uk link here . You do not have to wait a year to be entitled to take annual leave, you accumulate leave entitlement as you work.
ContractsAndAgreements - 3-Nov-17 @ 11:59 AM
I was wondering if I may ask a question here- I looked for the information on the internet, but because of the particular terms of the arrangement, I could not really find an answer. I work as a personal assistant for a disabled person,2 weeks on 2 weeks off live in basis. I get paid (payslip) every 4 weeks. I work minimum 12 hours/day/ 14 days. My question is: I am legally entitled to paid holiday after a year and if so, how many days? When I start the job we had a verbal agreement. I would very much appreciate if somebody will answer to me.
David - 2-Nov-17 @ 9:49 AM
@sarah - It's up to your mum what she wishes to do with her money, not your sister. Unless your mum has dementia or anything that your sister can prove you have taken advantage her then there is little your sister can do. Your sister may think she has personally been treated unfairly, in which case she would have to take this up directly with your mum.
GregF - 30-Oct-17 @ 12:36 PM
my mother lent us a lge sum of money. initially 100,000 6 yrs ago. then another 80,000 2 yrs ago. we had an agreement verbal and the amounts written in her diary. We agreed to pay her the interest only on the loan at 3%. she never wanted the money back just the interest. last year mum said stop paying the interest I don't want the money. so we stopped. my sister has found out and is furious. many emails of slander and abuse. she believes we a have taken advantage of mums goodwill ( she has some confusion) she wants us to back pay the amounts of interest she reakons are owed to her and to restatrt to pay interest again. or borrow it all and pay mum back she feels cheated blah blah. she is questioning everything. ??? does she have a right here ???mum is still saying she doesn't want the money should we pay the interest mum doesn't care but feels my sister has missed out ..????
sarah - 28-Oct-17 @ 9:51 AM
I had a verbal agreement with a coworkers partner to personally rehome an abadoned kitten that was brought into the vets she worked at. I was due to have the cat today but woke up this morning with a very long facebook message from my coworker to say he has bad news and his partner had decided she now wanted the cat herself after being told that wasn’t an option until her mum saw how cute and fluffy it was. I know that pets are classed as property and would like confirmation if this is now a theft case as technically since 1.30pm on Tuesday, both my coworker and his partner told me the cat was mine.
Lozzaaa - 26-Oct-17 @ 1:21 AM
It seems a lot of contracts are made verbally on the telephone these days, for example arranging or cancelling insurance, being offered and accepting mobile telephone offers, changing electricity supplier, etc, all sorts of verbal agreements. I understand verbal agreements are legal, but that they can be difficult to verify and enforce. Companies are allowed to legally record telephone calls without informing the other party, but what is the case for individuals? I now try to record all phone calls I have with businesses for the purposes of record and to protect myself against the lies and cheating that seems to be getting more and more frequent these days and to hold them to their promises. If I don't inform the other party I am recording the conversation, will the recording still be accptable as evidence in court if there is a dispute in a verbal contract?
Rick - 25-Oct-17 @ 12:15 PM
I lent a friend in financial difficulty £700 on the condition that she would pay me back the following month after pay day.It's now been almost 18 months and I've only had half the money back.I still have the WhatsApp conversation where I offered the money and she agreed to repay, is this enforceable legally and how should I go about this?
TheGrubb - 24-Oct-17 @ 5:04 PM
@Sw - If no money has exchanged hands, then you have no rights of ownership of the sofa and the seller has every right to change her mind.
Robertt - 24-Oct-17 @ 2:48 PM
@Rubydouby - did your mum leave a will? If the house is in your sister's name, she effectively owns it regardless of whether you paid the mortgage or not. Where has your sister who owns the house disappeared to? You'd have to go an see a solicitor - but I don't think there is a lot you can do as it is your sister's property at the end of the day if her name is on the deeds.
Gel - 24-Oct-17 @ 10:45 AM
Hi Myself and 3 sisters had a verbal agreement that when our mother died her house profits would be split. One of my sisters daughters had the morgauge put into her name when it was first bought over 20 years ago because of mums finance problems. We all paid the morgauge between us untill we could not afford to and only one sister then carried on paying it. Mum died last week and the sisters daughter has sold the property to her step dads business without telling us and not for the full market value. What can we do about this. The sisters daughter has never paid any morgauge payments and is emergrating to new zealand at the end of the month. What can we do Thank you.
Rubydouby - 23-Oct-17 @ 11:31 AM
Gus - Your Question:
I worked with a firm and while I was working there I've been sent to get qualified further, they paid the plane and the B&B. Now because I ended the contract with them before one year they said I need to pay that money back but I was never informed about that verbally nor in writhing, actually what they say is that the manager verbally informed me that I need to repay the money if I don't stay one ear with them and she never even talked with me not just once. Yes I heard a rumor through the company after I finished the course but never from them. Are they entitled to do that?

Our Response:
Unless this agreement formed part of your employment contract or you signed a form in agreement, there is little your employer can do to pursue this.
ContractsAndAgreements - 20-Oct-17 @ 2:21 PM
We booked two weeks with Heart of the Lakes Ambleside for a cottage and a later week in September 2017. They did not inform us that construction work behind the cottage had been going on since before we booked. We contacted them and they told us to put it in writing when we got home. The second week this was added to by the road behind being dug up to lay pipes to the cottages. They breached their own written T&C's by not informing us of 'anything which may affect our holiday.' and twice by failing to move us. They have refunded half of the money but we lost all enjoyment of the holiday. Their solicitor says that they have no obligation to inform us of the construction works as it outside their control and that we refused a move to alternate accommodation. However, Heart of the Lakes have admitted that they knew about the construction work and that they should have informed us and moved us. Their excuse was that no one else had complained. They have failed on three of their T&C'S and we spent the whole two weeks with constant construction noise, even of a weekend. When we had booked we asked if the cottage was quiet and were informed that there was a B road at the back which went quiet at night and still we were not informed about the construction. Their legal team state in a letter to us that they had no lawful obligation to us. I thought that T&C'c were binding as if we had infringed them we would have been liable so why shouldn't they?
Caz - 20-Oct-17 @ 1:50 PM
A lady was selling a sofa to me as she was moving house, although on her moving day she did offer to deliver to me I didn't have the cash that day to pay her so I organised for it to be picked up by a van the following day which was going to cost me to pick up the sofa and deliver it. However the morning of the pick up she went back on her word and said she's keeping it I've lost out on the sofa and the delivery guy has had to be let down too how would I stand
Sw - 20-Oct-17 @ 9:06 AM
I worked with a firm and while I was working there I've been sent to get qualified further, they paid the plane and the B&B. Now because I ended the contract with them before one year they said I need to pay that money back but I was never informed about that verbally nor in writhing, actually what they say is that the manager verbally informed me that I need to repay the money if I don't stay one ear with them and she never even talked with me not just once. Yes I heard a rumor through the company after I finished the course but never from them.Are they entitled to do that?
Gus - 19-Oct-17 @ 8:06 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the ContractsAndAgreements website. Please read our Disclaimer.